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faculty member

  • Prof. Abraham (Avi) Sagi-Schwartz
  • Professor
  • Psychology
  • +972(0)0542688310
  • [email protected]
  • My main interests involve the study of children's emotional and social development, both at the level of basic research and its translation into applied matters, social policy and legislation around various issues pertaining to children and families. I trust that my research has contributed to the understanding of emotional processes among children growing up in different ecologies, both normative and at risk. Integrating social work and developmental psychology has been well reflected throughout my professional development and career over the past forty years. My activities throughout my career are characterized by an interdisciplinary approach, and the use of innovative research and professional tools that contribute to addressing challenging social issues, while relying on rigorous research in human development. I have been trying to create an important bridge between groundbreaking research knowledge and the design of innovative policies and the development of welfare services.

    I believe that the impact of my academic studies in the joint program at the University of Michigan on both my research and applied work is very evident. Thus, my work can be observed on issues concerned with the ill-effects of institutions on the development and emotional well-being of children, the role of the father in child development, foster care, children in times of divorce, adoption, day care, trauma research, intergenerational transfer of Holocaust trauma and studying the effects political violence on the wellbeing of children.

  • Personal background
    o I was born in Haifa in 1947 and grew up in this town. Citizen of Haifa ever since. Married to Ruthi + three daughters, 7 grandchildren. I was educated in Haifa and the USA (Ann Arbor, Michigan).

    o I served in the IDF reserve service as a senior mental health officer (until the age of 50).

    o Name change in mid-career, (see the articles "Back to Schwartz", in English and in Hebrew Ha’aretz April 14, 2004):  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EB90xPnMAMMAaN3TY2kVbldlOSqOEtZX/view

    Academic background
    o Social work, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (at the time: The University Institute of Haifa, branch of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem) – B.A.

    o Social work, University of Michigan – M.S.W.

    o Psychology, University of Michigan – M.A.

    o Social Work & Psychology (joint program), University of Michigan – Ph.D.

  • The following topics kept me busy over the past five decades:

    Communal sleep in Israeli kibbutzim
    As a young researcher, I was influenced by John Bowlby's work with children placed in institutions. In this context, my first research dealt with the effect of communal sleep in kibbutzim on the emotional development of children. The practice of communal sleep created a "natural laboratory" for quasi-experimental research in which basic scientific questions related to the effect of early parental separations on children's development could be better explored. While most children's upbringing conditions in the kibbutz environment were very favorable, sleeping away from parents at night was a significant deviation from the conditions considered critical in the field, for the development of secure parent-child relationships. With my co-workers (initially with Michael Lamb and David Oppenheim and then mainly with Ora Aviezer and Marinus van IJzendoorn, jointly with many graduate students), we studied the impact of these separations in a methodologically sophisticated way, and the findings of our research showed a significant number of children with insecure attachment, when raised in communal sleep, findings that also contributed later to the top-down decision to abolish communal sleep (See items 28, 29, 32, 38, 39, 53, 56, 62, 64, 65, 71, 74, 76, 78, 92, 105). see publications list:
    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Tg2RfDaa4GzO64knbX-AqHa-rdBnf7HQ

    The findings go hand-in-hand with Bowlby's observations when he visited Israeli kibbutzim in the early 1950s and predicted that "this child-rearing context, though, clearly different from institutional care, might produce higher rates of attachment insecurity". I was so delighted when I learned that this work led me to be bestowed with the "Bowlby-Ainsworth award on attachment research, the New York Attachment Consortium": https://www.centermhp.org/2015-awardees

    Foster care
    In 2012, the Casey Foundation invited a group of 10 leading experts from around the world to discuss issues of residential care, mainly given the growing concerns that welfare agencies sometimes too easily give up on keeping children with their biological parents or on placing them in foster when in need, and instead they use at-risk residential care. In light of the kibbutz's work, it was rather rewarding to be a member of this study group that concluded with a translational knowledge document: Dozier, M., Kaufman, J. Kobak, R.R., O'Connor, T.G. Sagi-Schwartz, A., Scott, S., Shauffer, C., Smetana, J., van IJzendoorn, M.H, & Zeanah, C.H. (2014)). Consensus statement on group care for children and adolescents. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 84 (3), 219-225. See item 121, in the publications list:
    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Tg2RfDaa4GzO64knbX-AqHa-rdBnf7HQ
    The article was adopted by the American Association for Orthopsychiatry as a consensus document and we hope it will continue to make an impact in various countries, with welfare services recognizing the need to integrate children into foster care rather than institutional settings. The Child Protection Agency in the Ministry of Welfare in Israel adopted this position paper, and later I was invited to serve as a guest editor of the major social work journal in Israel - "Society and Welfare" - to further discuss the issue. See item 129 in the publications list:
    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Tg2RfDaa4GzO64knbX-AqHa-rdBnf7HQ

    I trust that we bring here, to the attention of welfare workers who work for the benefit of children who are at serious environmental risk, the study of developmental psychology at its best.

    These studies have important implications for a myriad of universal issues: removing children from the home and what children are likely to experience as a result of separation from parents, placement children in non-family settings vis-à-vis foster care, divorce and separating children from one parent (usually the father), timing of adoption, and more. I believe that these studies exemplify an interdisciplinary integration between basic research in the field of child development and issues with implications for the welfare system, namely, translational knowledge. This is being illustrated more in the section regarding foster care.

    Divorce
    I was privileged to be one of the members in the national public committee to examine the legal aspects of parental responsibility in divorce. Much of the committee's recommendations are based on attachment theory and research, and the influence on changing the thinking about child best interests in the areas of divorce, welfare, and law is noticeable. This effect is reflected in increasing changes both in the activity of social workers and in the general mindset, as well as rulings of family judges and courts of appeal. The consensus statement made by 70 scholars from around the world is noted here: Attachment goes to court: child protection and custody issues, Attachment & Human Development, DOI: 0.1080/14616734.2020.1840762 See item 135 in the publications list:
    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Tg2RfDaa4GzO64knbX-AqHa-rdBnf7HQ

    Also note that in the unfortunate context of COVID19, Israel has undergone already several lockdowns. Thanks to this work, "attachment went also to the Israeli government" with a decision that children in divorced families could move between the homes of mothers and fathers, regardless of distance, to maintain contact with both, despite the strict lockdown which included restrictions to move no more than 100 meters away from home.

    Day Care Centers
    An important derivative of the kibbutz's findings was a growing concern about the impact of prolonged stay in day care centers on the emotional and social development of children, especially during the first two years of life. With a large research grant from NICHD to investigate this issue, we have shed light on the risk on the development of children involved in prolonged stays in low-quality day care centers. See items 49, 73, 81, 96, 105 in the publications list:
    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Tg2RfDaa4GzO64knbX-AqHa-rdBnf7HQ
     
    These findings received much scientific resonance as well as public resonance in Israel. Recognition of this research led the Department of Day Care in the Ministry of Labor and Welfare to invite our team to lead a national project "First Settings" and to prepare a standards document for the supervision of day care centers in Israel. We create here a link between state-of-the-art research in developmental psychology concerning early childhood and the optimization of the well-being of young families and their children who use daycare in Israel.
     
    Trauma
    I have also devoted the last three decades to advance trauma research, addressing the place of attachment theory and its implications for prevention and intervention.
     
     
    Traumas of war and political violence
    I organized an international conference with the support of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, and the fruits of this not obvious Israeli-Palestinian conference were published in a special issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Development, jointly with a Palestinian co-guest editor. In this work, in the context of political violence, I continued to emphasize the theoretical and research innovations, but not less important I created a dialogue between Palestinians and Israelis (including Gaza and West Bank) to discuss the effects of chronic conflict in the region as well as optimal ways to protect children from the distress involved by being exposed to violence and trauma. In this context, I was invited as a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C., to further study the original developmental concept "circles of security" as it may bear to conflict resolution and diplomacy. The work is summarized in an article with innovative proposals linking a systemic-ecological model of human development with issues of political violence and it published in: Children of war and peace: A human development perspective. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 56, 933-951, 2012. See item 113 and also 103 in the publications list:
    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Tg2RfDaa4GzO64knbX-AqHa-rdBnf7HQ
     
    Attachment in a cross-cultural context
    Over the past three decades, with my Dutch colleagues Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marinus van IJzendoorn, and Judi Mesman, we have addressed cross-cultural issues in the study of attachment. We have shown the universal aspects of attachment theory, even in the context of many diverse cultures in all continents. See items 42, 70, 93, 126, 130, 132 in the publications list https://tinyurl.com/2p8khm5n. Note in particular our chapter in three editions of the Handbook of Attachment which has gained much attention in the field. See items 63, 101, 127 in the publications list https://tinyurl.com/2p8khm5n. The collaborative work on this topic as well as on the kibbutz and the Holocaust trauma led van IJzendoorn and me to receive jointly the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD):

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E-tCqDfqdcafBQ75TFTeJppLJOXyXPWe/view

    Attachment networks
    Over the past several years Or Dagan and I have paid closer attention to infants’ patterns of attachment to both their mothers and fathers and they jointly influence important developmental outcomes. We have noticed that such studies are few, based on small samples, and not well-designed longitudinally. Moreover, we have also noted the mixed results on how infants’ attachment patterns to mothers and fathers affect important developmental outcomes, resulting in theoretical inconsistencies regarding the model that best describes the organization of multiple attachment relationships and their effect on later development. This has become in recent years a hot issue, and in a number of publications we review research on the unsettled issue of infants’ network of attachment to mothers and fathers, and propose explanatory models that can be tested empirically alongside methods likely to be more robust and innovative than those that have been used traditionally. See items 131,133 in the publications list:
    Also mote the special issue: Dagan, O., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & van IJzendoorn, M. Guest Editors, on Attachment network, New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development.
  • Socio-emotional development across the life cycle from a cross-cultural perspective, children's adjustment in situations of extreme stress, the study of the effects of the Holocaust over three generations, children at risk and child services, applications of scientific knowledge in the field of care and education in early childhood, public policy, law and legislation in children-related issues.

  • Special scientific-academic appointments, recognition of achievements, and awards

    o Research Scholar, Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation, Institute of Psychology, Regensburg University (Germany, 1986)

    o Holder of the Chair in Attachment across the Life Span, Leiden University, Leiden (The Netherlands, 2005)

    o Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, United States Institute of Peace (USIP) (Washington, DC, 2005/6)

    To read more about the Program, please view:

    https://www.usip.org/grants-fellowships/fellowships/jennings-randolph-senior-fellowship-program

    o Distinguished International Contributions to Child Development Award, Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) (Bestowed in Boston, March, 2007) To see more, please view:

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E-tCqDfqdcafBQ75TFTeJppLJOXyXPWe/view

    o Phyllis Greenberg Heideman and Richard D. Heideman Fellow, The Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, DC (2012/2013). To read more about Fellows and Scholars of the Mandel Center, please view:

    https://www.ushmm.org/research/about-the-mandel-center/all-fellows-and-scholars/category/S

    o Honorary member (2013-present), The Society for Emotion and Attachment Studies (SEAS). To read more about SEAS, please view:

    https://seasinternational.org/about-us/

    o Bowlby-Ainsworth Award on Attachment Research, The New York Attachment Consortium (Bestowed in Philadelphia, March, 2015), view:

    https://www.centermhp.org/2015-awardees

    o Scholar-In-Residence, Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) (2020, deferred because of the COVID19 pandemic)

    o Fellow, International Society for the Study of Development (ISSBD)(2020 -present)

    o 2021 Michigan Social Work Centennial Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Michigan, view:

    https://ssw.umich.edu/offices/alumni/distinguished-alumni-awards

    o 2022 Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Behavioral Theory and Research, International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development (ISSBD) (June 2022)

     

    • Google Scholar Citations: 12610, h-index: 50, i-index: 76
    1. Sagi, A., & Hoffman, M.L. (1976). Emphatic distress in the newborn. Developmental Psychology, 12, 175‑176. (Also selected to be reprinted in item 55).

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Guiora, A.Z. (1978). A cross-cultural study of symbolic meaning: Developmental aspects. Language Learning, 28, 381‑386.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1979). Labeling, attention and perception: A developmental study. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 49, 47‑59.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1979). The effects of labeling and perceptual training on perception and discrimination learning in young children. Language Learning, 29, 321‑325.

     

    1. Eisikovits, Z., & Sagi, A. (1979). Prosocial aspects of antisocial behavior. Society and Welfare, 1, 187‑193. (Hebrew).

     

    1. Eisikovits, Z., & Sagi, A. (1979). Prosocial aspects of antisocial behavior. In Child and Welfare in Israel. Edited by Conference Committee of the Israeli Association of Social Workers, Tel Aviv: Avnat Publishing. (Hebrew).

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1980). Color-word interference in a recall test. Journal of General Psychology, 103, 149‑154.

     

    1. Guiora, A.Z., Beit‑Hallahmi, B., & Sagi, A. (1980). A cross-cultural study of symbolic meaning. Balshanut Shimushit: Journal of the Israeli Association for Applied Linguistics, 2, 27‑40.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1980/81). Development of children's automatic word-processing: A re‑examination. Journal of Experimental Education, 49, 100‑105.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1981). Mothers' and non-mothers' identification of infant cry. Infant Behavior and Development, 4, 37‑40.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Eisikovits, Z. (1981). Juvenile Delinquency and moral development. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 8, 79‑93.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Guiora, A.Z. (1981). Uno studio trans‑cultural del significato simbolico: Aspetti evolutivi. In O. Andreani (Ed.), Aspetti biosociali dello svilluppo, 2nd Vol Processi Cognitivi. Milano, Franco Angeli, Publisher.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1982). Antecedents and consequences of various degrees of paternal involvement in childrearing: The Israeli project. In M.E. Lamb (Ed.), Nontraditional families: Parenting and child development (pp. 205-232). Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1982). Adults' responses to normal and pathological cries. Preventive Psychiatry, 1, 359‑364.

     

    1. Eisikovits, Z., & Sagi, A. (1982). Moral development and discipline encounter in delinquent and non-delinquent adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 11, 217‑230.

     

    1. Radin, N. & Sagi, A. (1982). Childrearing fathers in intact families with preschoolers: U.S.A. and Israel. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 28, 111‑136.

     

    1. Lamb, M.E., & Sagi, A. (Eds.), (1983). Fatherhood and Family Policy. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1983). Grammatical gender, symbolic meaning and gender concept: Recall, classification, and preference tests. Psychology and Human Development, 1, 1‑9.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Sharon, N. (1983). The role of the father in the family: A new perspective and implications for family policy. Society and Welfare, 53, 3‑14. (Hebrew).

     

    1. Lamb, M.E., Campos, J.J., Hwang, C.P., Leiderman, P.H., Sagi, A., & Svedja, M. (1983). Joint reply to "Maternal-infant bonding a joint rebuttal". Pediatrics, 72, 574‑576.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Eisikovits, Z., & Baizerman, M. (1983). Prosocial and antisocial behavior: Can bad people be good? Israel Studies in Criminology, 8.

     

    1. Sagi, A. & Sharon, N. (1983). Costs and benefits of increased paternal involvement in childrearing: The societal perspective. In M.E. Lamb & A. Sagi (Eds.), Fatherhood and Family Policy (pp. 219-234). Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

     

    1. Lamb, M.E., Russell, G. & Sagi, A. (1983). Summary and recommendations for public policy. In M.E. Lamb & A. Sagi, (Eds.), Fatherhood and Family Policy (pp. 247-258). Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

     

    1. Eisikovits, Z., & Sagi, A. (1984). Abusing children's developmental potential: The case of moral Development. In A. Carmi & H. Zimrin (Eds.), Child abuse and Neglect. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer‑Verlangen.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Sharon, N. (1984). The role of the father in the family: Toward a sex-neutral family policy. Children and Youth Services Review, 6, 83‑99.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Reshef, R. (1984). Paternal expectations, aspirations and involvement in childrearing in intact families in Israel: Antecedents and consequences. Megamot: Behavioral Sciences Quarterly, 28, 81‑94 (Hebrew).

     

    1. Bustan, D., & Sagi, A. (1984). Early hospital-based intervention with mothers of premature infants and its effects on maternal attitudes and feelings, maternal perception of and interaction with their 3‑months old infants. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 5, 305‑317.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Lamb, M.E., Lewkowicz, K., Shoham, R., Dvir, R., & Estes, D. (1985). Security of infant-mother, ‑father and ‑metapelet attachments among kibbutz-reared Israeli children. In I. Bretherton & E. Waters (Eds.), Growing points in attachment theory and research (pp.257‑275). Monographs of the Society for Research on Child Development, 50, (Serial #209 No.1‑2).

     

    1. Sagi, A., Lamb, M.E., Shoham, R. Dvir, R., & Lewkowicz, K. (1985). Parent-infant interaction in families on Israeli kibbutzim. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 8, 273‑284.

     

    1. Sagi, A., (1985). Attitudes of employers toward family policy and increased paternal involvement in child care. Child Care Quarterly, 14, 273‑282.

     

    1. Seagull, E.A., Sagi, A., Tirosh, E., & Jaffe, M. (1986). Letter to the editor. Child Abuse and Neglect, 10, 569.

     

    1. Sagi, A. Lamb, M.E. & Gardner, W. (1986). Relationships between Strange Situation behavior and stranger sociability among infants on Israeli kibbutzim. Infant Behavior and Development, 9, 271‑282.

     

    1. Gardner, W., Lamb, M.E., Thompson, R., & Sagi, A. (1986). On individual differences in Strange Situation behavior: Categorical and continuous measurement systems in a cross cultural data set. Infant Behavior and Development, 9, 355‑375.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1987). Value biases in child custody disputes and recommendations: A study of Israeli social work students. Journal of Divorce, 10, 27-42.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Lewkowicz, K. (1987). A cross-cultural evaluation of attachment research. In L. Tavecchio & M.H. Van IJzendoorn (Eds.), Advances in Psychology Series: attachment in social networks – contributions to attachment theory. Amsterdam: North Holland.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Koren, N., & Weinberg, M. (1987). Fathers in Israel. In M.E. Lamb (Ed.), The father's role: Cross-cultural perspectives (pp. 197-226). Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Koren, N. (1988). Fathering in the 1980's and beyond: Recent developments and emerging trends. Society and Welfare, 8, 344‑350. (Hebrew).

     

    1. Oppenheim, D., Sagi, A., & Lamb, M.E. (1988). Infant-adult attachments on the kibbutz and their relation to socioemotional development four years later. Developmental Psychology, 24, 427‑433. (Also selected to be reprinted in next item).

     

    1. Oppenheim, D., Sagi, A., & Lamb, M.E. (1988). Infant-adult attachments on the kibbutz and their relation to socioemotional development four years later. In S. Chess & M.E. Hertzig (Eds.), Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child Development. N.Y.: Brunner/Mazel. (pp. 92‑106).

     

    1. Sagi, A., Jaffe, M., Tirosh, E., Findler, L., & Harel, J. (1988). Maternal risk status and outcome measures: A Three-stage study in Israel. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 19, 137‑149.

     

    1. Eisikovits, Z., & Sagi. A. (1989). Determinants of spouse abuse: An Israeli perspective. Aggressive Behavior, 15, 53-54.

     

    1. Sagi, A. (1990). Attachment theory and research in a cross-cultural perspective. Human Development, 33, 10‑22.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Mayseless, O., Aviezer, O., Donnell, F., Joels, T., Harel, Y., & Tuvia, M. (1990). Early day care in the kibbutz: An ecological experiment. In E. Becchi (Ed.), Psychopedagogic Problems during Infancy (Italian).

     

    1. Lazar, A., Sagi, A., & Fraser, M.W. (1991). Involving fathers in social services. Children and Youth Services Review, 13, 287‑301.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., & Karie-Koren, N. (1991). Primary appraisal of the Strange Situation: A cross-cultural analysis of preseparation episodes. Developmental Psychology, 27, 587‑596.

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Sagi, A., & Lambermon, M.W. (1992). The multiple caretaker paradox: some data from Holland and Israel. In R.C. Pianta (Ed.), Special issue on Relationships between children and non-parental adults. New Directions in Child Development, 57, 524.

     

    1. Koren-Karie, N. & Sagi, A. (1992). Professional decisions made by social workers regarding infant-mother attachment. Children and Youth Services Review, 14, 437‑457.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Dvir, R. (1993). Value biases of social workers in custody disputes. Children and Youth Services Review, 15, 27‑42.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Koren-Karie, N. (1993). Daycare centers in Israel: An Overview. In M. Cochran (Ed.), International handbook of day care policies and programs (pp. 269-290). N.Y.: Greenwood.

     

    1. Klingman, A., Sagi, A., & Raviv, A. (1993). The effect of war on Israeli children. In L.A. Leavitt & N.A. Fox (Eds.), Psychological effects of war and violence on children (pp. 49-92). Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Aviezer, O, Donnell, & Mayseless (1994). Sleeping out of home in a kibbutz communal arrangement: It makes a difference for infant-mother attachment. Child Development, 65, 992-1004.

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Van IJzendoorn, Sagi, A., & Schuengel, C. (1994). Collective child‑rearing: Implications for socio‑emotional development from 70 years of experience in Israeli kibbutzim. Psychological Bulletin, 116, 99-116 (also selected to be reprinted in next item).

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Van IJzendoorn, Sagi, A., & Schuengel, C. (1996). Collective child‑rearing: Implications for socio‑emotional development from 70 years of experience in Israeli kibbutzim. In M.E. Hertzig & E.A. Farber (Eds.) (1996) Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child Development (pp. 65-108).

     

    1. Sagi, A., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Scharf, M., Koren-Karie, N., Joels, T., & Mayseless, O. (1994). Stability and discriminant validity of the Adult Attachment Interview: A psychometric study. Developmental Psychology, 30, 771-777.

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Hoffman, M.L. (1994). Emphatic distress in the newborn. In B. Puka, (Ed). Reaching out: Caring, altruism, and prosocial behavior. Moral development: A compendium, Vol. 7. (pp. 159-160). New York, NY: Garland Publishing (reprinted from item 1)

     

    1. Sagi, A., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Aviezer, O., Donnell, F., Koren-Karie, N., & Joels, T, & Harel, Y. (1995). Attachments in a multiple-caregiver and multiple-infant environment: The case of the Israeli kibbutzim. In E. Waters, B.E. Vaughn, G. Posada, & K. Kondo-Ikemura (Eds.), Caregiving, cultural, and cognitive perspectives on secure-base behavior and working models: New growing points of attachment theory and research (pp. 71-91). Special issue in the Monographs of the Society for Research on Child Development, 60, (Serial #244 No. 2-3).

     

    1. Posada, G., Gao, Y., Wu, F., Posada, R., Tascon, M., Schelmerich, A., Sagi, A., Kondo-Ikemura, K., Haaland, W., & Synnevaag, B. (1995). The secure-base phenomenon across cultures: Children's behavior, mothers' preferences, and experts' concepts. In E. Waters, B.E. Vaughn, G. Posada, & K. Kondo-Ikemura (Eds.), Caregiving, cultural, and cognitive perspectives on secure-base behavior and working models: New growing points of attachment theory and research (pp. 27-48). Special issue in the Monographs of the Society for Research on Child Development, 60, (Serial #244 No. 2-3).

     

    1. Sagi, A., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (1996). Multiple caregiving environments: The kibbutz experience. In S. Harel & J.P. Shonkoff (Eds.), Early childhood intervention and family support programs: Accomplishments and challenges (pp. 143-162). Jerusalem: JDC-Brookdale Institute of Gerontology and Human Development.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Scharf, M., Joels, T., Koren-Karie, N., Mayseless, O., & Aviezer, O. (1997). Ecological constraints for intergenerational transmission of attachment. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 20, 287-299.

     

    1. Mayseless, O., Sharabany, R., & Sagi, A. (1997). Attachment concerns of mothers as manifested in parental, spousal, and friendship relationships. Personal Relationships, 4, 255-269.

     

    1. Bar-On, D., Eland, J., Kleber, R.J., Krell, R., Moore, Y., Sagi, A., Soriano, E., Suedfeld, P., Van der Velden, P.G., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (1998). Multigenerational perspectives of coping with the Holocaust experience: On the developmental sequelae of trauma across generations. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 22, 315-338.

     

    1. Aviezer, O. Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Sagi, A., & Schuengel, C. (1998). “Children of the dream” revisited: 70 years of collective early child care in Israeli kibbutzim. In: Y. Dar (Ed.) Education in a Changing Kibbutz: Sociological and Psychological Perspectives (pp. 61-83). Jerusalem, Hebrew University: Magnes (Hebrew).

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H. & Sagi, A. (1999). Cross-cultural patterns of attachment: Universal and contextual dimensions. In J. Cassidy & P. Shaver (Eds.) Handbook of attachment (pp. 713-734). New York: Guilford (see also items 101 and 127 for 2nd and 3rd editions).

     

    1. Aviezer, O. and Sagi, A. (1999). The rise and fall of collective sleeping and its impact on the relationships of kibbutz children and parents. In M. Folling-Albers & W. Folling (Eds.), The transformation of collective education in the kibbutz: The end of utopia as a social reality (pp. 192-211). Frankfurt/Main, Germany: Peter Lang Publishers

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Sagi, A., Joels, T., & Ziv, Y. (1999). Emotional availability and attachment representations in kibbutz infants and their mothers. Developmental Psychology, 35, 811-822.

     

    1. Maital, S.L., Dromi, E., Sagi, A., & Bornstein, M.H. (2000). The Hebrew Communicative Development Inventory: Language specific properties and cross-linguistic generalizations. Journal of Child Language, 27, 43-67.

     

    1. Koren-Karie, N. & Sagi, A. (2000). Parental dilemmas concerning their infants: Parental employment and decision making about non-parental care for infants. In P. Klein (Ed.), Infants: Today and tomorrow (pp.119-142). Bar-Ilan University Press, Ramat-Gan, Israel (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Ziv, Y., Aviezer, A., Gini, M. Sagi, A., & Koren-Karie, N. (2000). Emotional availability in the mother-infant dyad as related to the quality of infant-mother attachment relationship. Journal of Attachment and Human Development, 2, 149-169.

     

    1. Sagi, A. and Dolev, S. (2001). Parents, educational settings and children in Israel: “Sweet and sour” Megamot: Behavioral Sciences Quarterly, 41, 195-217 (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H. & Sagi, A. (2001). Cultural blindness or selective inattention? American Psychologist, 56, 824-825.

     

    1. Sagi, A. & Aviezer, O. (2001). The rise and fall of children’s communal sleeping in Israeli kibbutzim: An experiment in nature and implications for parenting. An Invited Target Essay for ISSBD Newsletter, Number 1 serial no.38, 4-6.

     

    1. Oppenheim, D., Koren-Karie, N., & Sagi, A. (2001). Mothers’ empathic understanding of their preschoolers’ internal experience: Relations with early attachment. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 25, 17-27.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Koren-Karie, N., Gini, M., Ziv, Y., & Joels, T. (2002). Shedding further light on the effects of various types and quality of early child care on infant-mother attachment relationship: The Haifa study of early child care. Child Development, 73, 1166-1186.

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Sagi, A., Resnick, G., & Gini, M. (2002). School Competence in Young Adolescent Children: The Impact of Early Attachment Relationships. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 26, 397-409.

     

    1. Bar-Haim, Y. Aviezer, O., Berson, Y. & Sagi, A. (2002). Attachment in infancy and personal space regulation in early Adolescence. Journal of Attachment and Human Development, 4, 68-83.

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Sagi, A. & van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2002). Collective sleeping for kibbutz children: An experiment in nature predestined to fail. Family Process, 41, 435-454.

     

    1. Sagi, A., van IJzendoorn, M.H., Joels, T., & Scharf, M. (2002). Disorganized Reasoning in Holocaust Survivors: An Attachment Perspective. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 72, 194-203.

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Koren-Karie (2003). Ecological Constraints on the Formation of Infant – Mother Attachment Relations: When Maternal Sensitivity Becomes Ineffective. Infant Behavior and Development, 26, 285-299.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A, van IJzendoorn, M.H., Grossmann, K.E., Joels, T., Grossmann, K., Scharf, M., Koren-Karie, N., & Alkalay, S. (2003). Attachment and Traumatic Stress in Female Holocaust Child Survivors and Their Daughters, American Journal of Psychiatry, 160, 1086-1092.

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2003). Are children of Holocaust survivors less well-adapted?  No meta-analytic evidence for secondary traumatization. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 16, 459-469.

     

    1. Love, J.M., Harrison, L. Sagi-Schwartz, van IJzendoorn, M.H., Ross, C., Ungerer, J.A, Raikes, H., Brady-Smith, C., Boller, K., Brooks-Gunn, J., Constantine, J., Eliason Kisker, E., Paulsell, D., & Chazan-Cohen, R. (2003) . Child care quality matters:  How conclusions may vary with context. Child Development, 74, 1021-1033.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz (2003). Introduction to the special issue: Extreme life events and catastrophic experiences and the development of attachment across the life span. Journal of Attachment and Human Development, 5, 327 – 329.

     

    1. Koren-Karie, N. & Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Joels, J. (2003). Absence of Attachment Representations (AAR) in the adult years: The emergence of a new AAI classification in catastrophically traumatized Holocaust child survivors. Journal of Attachment and Human Development, 5, 381-397.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A., Koren-Karie, N., & Joels, J. (2003). The Adult Attachment Interview and Failed Mourning: The Case of Holocaust Child Survivors. Journal of Attachment and Human Development, 5, 398-408.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A, van IJzendoorn, M.H., Grossmann, K.E., Joels, T., Grossmann, K., Scharf, M., Koren-Karie, N., & Alkalay, S. (2004). Les survivants de l'holocauste et leurs enfants: Les enfants survivants -- mais pas leurs enfants -- souffrent d'expériences traumatiques liées à l' Holocauste. Devenir, 16, 77-107 (French version of item 79).

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Sagi, A., & van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2003). Familia eta Kolektibitatea orekatzea haurren hazkuntzan. Zergatik kibutzetako logela komunen amaiera predestinaturik zegoen. Jakingarriak, ,49-50, 44-55. (Basque version of item 76).

     

    1. Ziv, Y., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2004). Social information processing in middle childhood: Relation to infant-mother attachment, Journal of Attachment and Human Development, 6, 327-348.

     

    1. Sagi, A., Lamb, M. E., Lewkowitcz, K. S., Shoham, R., Dvir, R. y Estes, D. (2004). Seguridad de los apegos infante-madre, padre y cuidador entre los niños israelíes criados en kibbutz. In M. C. Juárez Hernández. Influencia cultural en el vínculo madre-infante, Universidad Pedagógocal Nacional, Colección Textos. Número 41(pp. 83-108). México (Spanish version of item 28).

     

    1. Posada, G., Gao, Y., Wu, F. Posada, R., Tascon, M., Scjöelmerich, A., Sagi, A., Kondo-Ikemura, K., Haaland, W. y Synnevaag, B. (2004). El fenómeno de la base segura entre culturas: El comportamiento de los miños, las preferencias de las madres y los conceptos de los expertos. In M. C. Juárez Hernández. Influencia cultural en el vínculo madre-infante, Universidad Pedagógocal Nacional, Colección Textos. Número 41(pp 171-201). México (Spanish version of item 57).

     

    1. van IJzendoorn, M. H. y Sagi, A. (2004). Patrones transculturales del apego: dimensiones universals y contextuales. In M. C. Juárez Hernández. Influencia cultural en el vínculo madre-infante, Universidad Pedagógocal Nacional, Colección Textos. Número 41(pp. 291-335). México (Spanish version of item 63).

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2004). Errors in court decisions: The case of adoption. Psycho-Actualia, October issue, 30-39 (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Aviezer, O. (2005). Correlates of Attachment to Multiple Caregivers in Kibbutz Children from Birth to Emerging Adulthood: The Haifa Longitudinal Study. In K.E. Grossmann, K. Grossmann & E. Waters (Eds.), Attachment from Infancy to Adulthood ( 165-197). N.Y.: Guilford.

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2005). Attachment across diverse sociocultural contexts: The limits of universality. In K. Rubin & O. Boon Chung (Eds.), Parental beliefs, behaviors, and parent-child relations: A cross-cultural perspective) 107-136). N.Y.: Psychology Press.

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2005). L'attaccmento nei diversi contesi socioculturali: I limiti dell'universalita, Psicoterapia 30, 107- 131. (Italian version of previous item).

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A, van IJzendoorn, M.H., Grossmann, K.E., Joels, T., Grossmann, K., Scharf, M., Koren-Karie, N., & Alkalay, S. (2005). Attaccmento e stress traumatico nelle bambine sopravvissute all'Olocausto e nelle loro figlie, Psicoterapia 30, 183- 192. (Italian version of item 79).

     

    1. Koren-Karie, N., Sagi-Schwartz, A, & Egoz-Mizrachi, N. (2005). The emotional quality of day care centers in Israel: The Haifa study of early child care, Infant Mental Health Journal, 26, 110-126.

     

    1. Oppenheim, D., Koren-Karie, N., & Sagi-Schwartz (2007). Emotional dialogues between mothers and children at 4.5 and 7.5 years: Relations with children’s attachment at 1 year, Child Development, 78, 38-52.

     

    1. Gini, M., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz (2007). Negotiation styles in mother-child narrative co-construction in middle childhood: Associations with early attachment. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 31, 149–160.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A, Joels, T., van IJzendoorn, M.H., Grossmann, K.E., Grossmann, K., Scharf, M., Koren-Karie, N., & Alkalay, S. (2007). Child survivors - but not their children – suffer from traumatic holocaust experiences. In J. Chaitin & Z. Salomon (Eds.) Shoah and Trauma (pp. 337-363). Tel Aviv, Israel: HaKibbutz Hameuchad Press (Hebrew).

     

    1. Bar-Haim, Y., Dan, O, Eshel, Y, & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2007). Predicting children's anxiety from early attachment relationships, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 21, 1061-1068.

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M.H. & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2008). Cross-cultural patterns of attachment: Universal and contextual dimensions. In J. Cassidy & P. Shaver (Eds.) Handbook of attachment. (pp. 880-905). New York: Guilford (2nd edition).

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A., Seginer, R., & Abdeen, Z. (Guest Eds.) (2008). Chronic exposure to catastrophic war experiences and political violence: Links to the well-being of children and their families. Introduction to the special issue. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 32, 253-255.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A (2008). The wellbeing of children living in chronic war zones: The Palestinian-Israeli case. International Journal of Behavioral Development 32, 318-332.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A., Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J. (2008). Does intergenerational transmission of trauma skip a generation? No meta-analytic evidence for tertiary traumatization with third generation of Holocaust survivors. Attachment and Human Development, 10, 105–121.

     

    1. Aviezer, O., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2008). Attachment and non-maternal care: Towards contextualizing the quantity versus quality debate. Attachment and Human Development.10, 275-285.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A. & Gini, M. (2008). Emotional-social circles of security between children and teachers in educational settings. In. Klein & Yablon, Y. (Eds.). From research to practice in early childhood education. (pp. 67-89). Jerusalem, Israel: The Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Barel, E., van IJzendoorn, M. H., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J. (2010) Surviving the Holocaust: A meta-analysis of the long-term sequelae of a genocide. Psychological Bulletin, 136, 677-698.

     

    1. Fridman, A., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2011). Coping in old age with extreme childhood trauma: Aging Holocaust survivors and their offspring facing new challenges. Aging and Mental Health, 15, 232–242.

     

    1. Dan, O., Sagi-Schwartz, A., Bar-Haim, & Eshel, Y. (2011). Effects of early relationships on children’s perceived control: A longitudinal study. International Journal of Behavioral Development. 35, 449-456.

     

    1. Fridman, A., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2012). Genetic Moderation of Cortisol Secretion in Holocaust Survivors: The Role of ADRA2B. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 36, 79 - 84.

     

    1. Joels, T. & Sagi-Schwartz, A. “Mom, dad, and what about me, I need you both”: Facts, myths and hopes in custody disputes (2012). Din Udvarim (Haifa Law Review), 6, 375-404 (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Sher-Censor, E., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2012). Individuation of female adolescents: Relations with adolescents' perceptions of maternal behavior and with adolescent-mother discrepancies in perceptions. Journal of Adolescence, 35, 397-405.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2012). Children of war and peace: A human development perspective. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 56, 933-951.

     

    1. Silbereisen, R.K., Titzmann, P.F., Michel, A., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Lavee, Y. (2012). The role pf developmental transitions in psychosocial competence: A comparison of native and immigrant young people in Germany. In A. S. Masten, K. Liebkind, and D. J. Hernandez (Eds.), Realizing the Potential of Immigrant Youth. (pp. 324-358). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

     

    1. Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Fridman, A., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Sagi-Schwartz, A., (2013). Holocaust survivors’ dissociation moderates offspring level of cortisol. Journal of Loss and Trauma, 18, 64-80.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz A, Bakermans-Kranenburg M.J, Linn S, van IJzendoorn M.H. (2013). Against all odds: Genocidal trauma is associated with longer life-expectancy of the survivors. PLoS ONE 8(7): e69179. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069179.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz A. & co-workers (2013). What can attachment theory and research tell us about the multiple facets of trauma? From severe vulnerability to promising resilience. In Barone, L. (Ed.). MEDIMOND International Proceedings – International Attachment Conference. (pp. 123-128). Bologna, Italy.

     

    1. Aviezer, O., Gini, M., Mark, Z., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2014). Student-teacher relationship as an emotional "secure-base" for the child's emotional wellbeing, academic motivation and functioning in school, Megamot: Behavioral Sciences Quarterly, 49 (3), 480-512 (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Silbereisen, R. K., Titzmann, P. F., Michel, A., Lavee, Y., Sagi-Schwartz, A. Mehlhausen Hasseon, D. (2014). Transitions to romantic involvement and living together: A comparison of psychosocial outcomes between natives and immigrants in Germany. In R. K. Silbereisen, P. F. Titzmann, & Y. Shavit (Eds.) The Challenges of Diaspora Migration: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Israel and Germany (pp. 211-229). Farnham, UK, Ashgate.

     

    1. Titzmann, P. F., Silbereisen, R. K., Michel, A., Lavee, Y., Sagi-Schwartz, A. Mehlhausen-Hasseon, D. (2014). Transitions to romantic involvement and living together: A comparisonof psychosocial outcomes between natives and immigrants in Israel. In R. K. Silbereisen, P. F.Titzmann, & Y. Shavit (Eds.) The Challenges of Diaspora Migration: InterdisciplinaryPerspectives on Israel and Germany (pp. 231-248). Farnham, UK, Ashgate.

     

    1. Dozier, M., Kaufman, J. Kobak, R.R., O'Connor, T.G. Sagi-Schwartz, A., Scott, S., Shauffer, C., Smetana, J., van IJzendoorn, M.H, & Zeanah, C.H. (2014)). Consensus statement on group care for children and adolescents. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 84 (3), 219-225.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2014). One-hundred and eleven international experts agree that infants and toddlers need night care by both parents upon separation and divorce. Psychoactualia, May issue, 30-40 (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A. & Shnit, D. (2014). The tender-years doctrine – The interpretation of the Supreme Court contradicts the best interest of the child. Psychoactualia, August issue, 35-43 (in Hebrew).

     

    1. Levert-Levitt E., and Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2015). Integrated attachment theory. In: James D. Wright (editor-in-chief), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition, Vol 12. (pp. 228–234). Oxford: Elsevier.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2015). Does extreme trauma transfer? The case of three generations of the Holocaust In Cherry K.E. (Ed.) Traumatic stress and long-term recovery - coping with disasters and other negative life events. (pp. 133-150). London / Heidelberg: Springer.

     

    1. Mesman, J., Van IJzendoorn M. H., Behrens, K., Carbonell, 0. , Carcamo, R. A., Cohen-Paraira, I., et al. (2016). Is the ideal mother a sensitive mother? Beliefs about early childhood parenting in mothers across the globe. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 40 (5), 385–397

     

    1. Mesman, J., Van IJzendoorn, M.H. & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2016). Cross-cultural patterns of attachment: Universal and contextual dimensions. In J. Cassidy & P. Shaver (Eds.) Handbook of attachment: Theory, research, and clinical applications (pp. 852-877). New York: Guilford (3rd edition).

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz (2016). Commentary: Important evidence highlights the meaning of teacher-child relationships for child development. International Journal of Developmental Science. 10 (3-4), 115-116.

     

    1. Sagi-Schwartz (2016). Placement of children in risk – What directions? Society and Welfare, 36, 261-271 (Hebrew).

     

    1. Zreik, G., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2017). Infant attachment and maternal sensitivity in the Arab minority in Israel. Child Development. 88(4), 1338–1349.DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12692.

     

    1. Dagan, O., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2018). Early Attachment network to mother and father: An unsettled issue. Child Development Perspectives. 12, 115–121 DOI: 10.1111/cdep.1227 2.

     

     

     

     

    1. Tarabeh, G., Zreik, G., Oppenheim, D., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & Koren-Karie, N.(2018) Maternal mind-mindedness and its association with attachment: the case of Arab infants and mothers in Israel, Attachment & Human Development, DOI: 10.1080/14616734.2018.1469653 

     

    1. Dagan, O., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2020). Infant attachment (to mother and father) and its place in human development: Five decades of promising research (and an unsettled issue). In Tamis-LeMonda. C.S. & J.J. Lockman (Eds.) Cambridge Handbook of Infant Development (pp. 687-714). Cambridge, UK.

     

    1. Alkalay, S., Sagi-Schwartz, A. & Wiseman, H. (2020). Increased empathy and helping behavior toward the mother in daughters of Holocaust survivors. Traumatology, 26(1), 84-95.

     

    1. Tommie Forslund, Pehr Granqvist, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Avi Sagi-Schwartz, Danya Glaser, Miriam Steele, Mårten Hammarlund, Carlo Schuengel, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Howard Steele, Phillip R. Shaver, Ulrike Lux, John Simmonds, Deborah Jacobvitz, Ashley M. Groh, Kristin Bernard, Chantal Cyr, Nancy L. Hazen, Sarah Foster, Elia Psouni, Philip A. Cowan, Carolyn Pape Cowan, Anne Rifkin-Graboi, David Wilkins, Blaise Pierrehumbert, George M. Tarabulsy, Rodrigo A. Carcamo, Zhengyan Wang, Xi Liang, Maria Kázmierczak, Paulina Pawlicka, Lilian Ayiro, Tamara Chansa, Francis Sichimba, Haatembo Mooya, Loyola McLean, Manuela Verissimo, Sonia Gojman-de-Millán, Marlene M. Moretti, Fabien Bacro, Mikko J. Peltola, Megan Galbally, Kiyomi Kondo-Ikemura, Kazuko Y. Behrens, Stephen Scott, Andrés Fresno Rodriguez, Rosario Spencer, Germán Posada, Rosalinda Cassibba, Neus Barrantes-Vidal, Jesus Palacios, Lavinia Barone, Sheri Madigan, Karen Mason-Jones, Sophie Reijman, Femmie Juffer, R. Pasco Fearon, Annie Bernier, Dante Cicchetti, Glenn I. Roisman, Jude Cassidy, Heinz Kindler, Peter Zimmerman, Ruth Feldman, Gottfried Spangler, Charles H. Zeanah, Mary Dozier, Jay Belsky, Michael E. Lamb & Robbie Duschinsky (2021) Attachment goes to court: child protection and custody issues, Attachment & Human Development, DOI: 10.1080/14616734.2020.1840762.

     

    1. Dagan, O., Sagi-Schwartz, A., & van IJzendoorn, M. Guest Editors (2021). An introduction to special issue on attachment network, New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development, 180, 5–8. https://doi:10.1002/cad.20453

     

    1. Dagan, O., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2021). Early attachment networks to multiple caregivers: History, assessment models, and future research recommendations. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 180, 9–19. https://doi.org/10.1002/cad.20446

     

    1. Dagan, O., Schuengel, C., Verhage, M. L., Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Sagi-Schwartz, A., Madigan, S., Duschinsky, R., Roisman, G. I., Bernard, K., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M., Bureau, J.-F., Volling, B. L., Wong, M. S., Colonnesi, C., Brown, G. L., Eiden, R. D., Fearon, R. M. P., Oosterman, M., Aviezer, O., Cummings, E. M. & The Collaboration on Attachment to Multiple Parents and Outcomes Synthesis (2021). Configurations of mother-child and father-child attachment as predictors of internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems: An individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 180, 67–94. https://doi.org/10.1002/cad.20450

     

    1. Forslund, T., Granqvist, P., van IJzendoorn, M. H., Sagi-Schwartz, A., Glaser, D., Steele, M., Hammarlund, M., Schuengel, C., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Steele, H., Shaver, P. R., Lux, U., Simmonds, J., Jacobvitz, D., Groh, A. M., Bernard, K., Cyr, C., Hazen, N. L., Foster, S., . . . Duschinsky, R. (2022). La prise en compte des liens d'attachement au tribunal: protection de l'enfance et décisions de résidence des enfants dans les situations de séparation parentale. Devenir, 34(1), 15-93. (French version of item 135).

     

    1. Ariav-Paraira, I., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (2022). Disrupted affective communication characterizes mothers of infants with disorganized but also ambivalent attachments: An Israeli study. Child Development, 93, e59–e70. https://doi.org/10.1111/cd ev.13679

     

    1. Ariav-Paraira, I., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (revise-resubmit). The combined contribution of maternal sensitivity and disrupted affective communication to infant attachment. Attachment and Human Development.

     

    1. Ariav-Paraira, I., Zreik, G., Oppenheim, D., & Sagi-Schwartz, A. (under review). Disrupted maternal communication and disorganized attachment the Arab society in Israel. Infant Mental Health Journal.
  • CV download
  • Scientific Conferences

    (Over 200 presentations in conferences, symposia, invited lectures, chair and discussant at invited symposia, etc.)

     

    Invited Speaker, keynotes, and special events (Selected list)

    • Holocaust child survivors as parents: A successful challenge, Invited lecture, Tel Aviv University Annual Board of Governors (June 1999).

    • Holocaust child survivors: The challenge of becoming successful parents Invited lecture, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (Washington, DC, December 2000).

    • When Quality of child care is poor children suffer: Some insights from Israel, Invited keynote at the Japanese Society of Child Health (Kobe, Japan, October, 2002).

    • When quality of childcare is poor children suffer: Some insights from Israel. Invited keynote at the symposium on International Strategies for Improving Relationship-based Group Care for Young Children, Zero to Three Conference, Sacramento, California, December 2004.

    • From basic child development research to the real world of children and their families. Invited talk, The World Bank Human Development Network, Washington, DC, June 2007.

    • From Context-Unique Research to Conclusions about Universal Developmental Processes, Keynote Address at the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, Würzburg, Germany, July, 2008.

    • Invited senior mentor in the Millennium Scholars Program, Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Montreal, Canada, March 29-April 2, 2011.

    • Early separation and loss of parents: Vulnerability and resilience across generations. Invited State-of-the-Art talk at the 12th European Congress of Psychology, July 4-8, 2011, Istanbul, Turkey.

    • What can attachment theory and research tell us about the multiple facets of trauma? From severe vulnerability to promising resilience. Keynote Lecture, 6th International Attachment Conference, Pavia, Italy, 30 August-1 September, 2013.

    • Life in the shadow of the Holocaust: A human development perspective across generations. Keynote Lecture, International conference: Memory, Identity, and Limits of Understanding: Jewish Sources and Resources, Copenhagen, Denmark, March 25-26, 2014

    • New meaning and hope in life as healing systems: The story of Holocaust survivors. Invited lecture at the Charlotte-Buehler-Symposium: New insights into Current Attachment Research. Vienna, Austria, March 29-30, 2015.

    • Shared care and the interplay of multiple attachments in historical Kibbutz. Invited lecture at the symposium "Out of Africa": Early childhood in the rural area around Zomba in Malawi. Vienna, Austria, May 2-3, 2016.

    • Psychology Speaker Series, New School for Social Research, New York, The importance of context: What research in specific settings can tell us about developmental universals?” May, 2016

    • Does trauma transfer? The case of three generations of the Holocaust. Invited lecture at Yad Vashem & United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in a symposium on Holocaust Research, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, February 20-21, 2017

    • Training professionals from developing countries: Telling lessons learned from an International MA program in Child Development. Plenary lecture, 2nd International Conference on Early Childhood Development, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, November 7-9, 2017

    • When the Unthinkable Happens: the case of three generations of the Holocaust. Invited lecture, School of Psychology, 10th Anniversary, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, April, 2019

    • Does trauma transfer? The case of three generations of the Holocaust, Plenary Lecture, Nordic Attachment Network, Gothenburg, Sweden, September 4-5, 2019

    • Early Attachment and Culture: Lessons from Around the World, Keynote Lecture, The Colorado Association for Infant Mental Health, May 1, 2020

    • Topic TBA, Keynote Lecture, Ibero-American Attachment Network Congress, Lima, Perú, September 2020 (postponed because of the COVID19 pandemic)

    • Holocaust survivors and their offspring: Vulnerability and resilience, Keynote Lecture and Plenary, 20th anniversary, International Attachment Conference, Ulm, Germany, September 12, 2021

    • Attachment networks to mothers and fathers:  How much do we know and what is still missing in the puzzle? Keynote Lecture, VII congress of the Iberoamerican Network of Attachment (RIA), Lima, Peru, November 10 -12, 2022